The KISS Principle

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I love looking at pretty, exciting sensory tubs. But when it’s been ages since you made one because you haven’t got time, then KISS. I kinda think the fancy ones are for me anyway.

Probably ought to apply that elsewhere in my life. 😉

Soap ‘Dough’

Welcome 2013!

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We started the new year with high intentions of more messy play. It was our first ever Messy Monday!

What better way to start of than my making soap. Messy and clean! This dough comes from the book “Little Kids Mould and Paint” and while you’d have to look at the book for the exact recipe it basically boils down to soap flakes and water. Once it dries – and this has taken overnight and is still going – they can be used to wash hands our whatever you would usually used a bar of soap for.

Some children just want life to be predictable…

Secondus is like that. In an attempt to make things easier for him, we are trying to be more clear about routines and rhythms, and what is coming up for our day. Today I discovered these cards offered graciously by Martianne Stanger. Thanks, Training Happy Hearts. In the interests of not reinventing the wheel, I thought I’d try them out! While you are there, have a look, too, at the neat Home Sensory Diet ABC cards for some great ideas for sensory activities.

Pineapple Playdough!

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Home Ed for Babies

I haven’t been blessed with babies who nap long enough 😉 and we have been getting dazzled lately as Tercio is getting quicker and quicker! I have decided to start something I used to do, but haven’t for a while – treasure baskets!

I first came across treasure baskets in the book “How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way” by Tim Seldin. But my treasure baskets didn’t really take off.

At Counting Coconuts, though, treasure baskets are a real inspiration. Make sure you look at her pinterest board too.

Now I am all inspired!

Adventures

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We love going on adventures! Adventures are our daily walk. Sometimes it’s a rambling walk, sometimes we have a specific quest in mind.

Walking in the same place is very rewarding. It provides a chance to notice the seasonal changes as they happen in our own little spot. It also encourages the children to start asking deeper questions about a place. Why do something grow in one spot but not another? What signs of birds or other animals are there and how does that change?

At the moment our own adventures are very similar to the description of Charlotte Mason’s nature study as described in Ambleside online, if you scroll past the prescribed list and read the description of how it should be implemented. Most of the time I just let the children discover what they will, but every so often I will send them off with a quest to look for something in particular – like The Quest for The Golden Leaf in Autumn.

Oh, and don’t forget to bring a bag, for all those leaves and feathers they will collect!

A short-lived sensory box

It got eaten!

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